TSB Conveyancing Lender Panel Compliance Tool

Lexsure’s COMPLETIONmonitor is an online pre- and post-completion checklist for residential conveyancing lawyers. Supported by the CML and professional indemnity insures. COMPLETIONmonitor is a unique risk management tool.

This software assists the way you can prove to lender panels that you are, and can stay fully compliant with their requirements, with automatic updates on TSB’s changes. While utilising COMPLETIONmonitor is not a condition for acceptance on the TSB panel, demonstrating you can remain up to date with TSB’s Handbook requirements is a helpful support to your panel application and, just as importantly, safeguard your panel standing.

The system creates real-time alerts, automatically produces SRA and CQS reports, and will improve your firm's efficiency. In addition it is user friendly, cost-effective and, for some firms, results in reduced PII premiums.

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Mortgage companies frequently vary their requirements. The UK Finance Lenders’ Handbook requirements from TSB are not guidelines, they are instructions from a client. As with many clients, instructions can change - and they do change, over time:

A Timeline of Policy Changes


Since 2008, TSB has made 82 revisions or additions to sections of their version of the CML Handbook.
That equates to a section change every 33.3 days. In total, 15% of the sections of P2 of the UK Finance Lenders’ Handbook for TSB have been changed since 15/12/2008.

To find out more about lender panel compliance,

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Recent Changes Include

# Date Assoc. Changes Related To
4.5a 30/04/2018 CML
4.5b 30/04/2018 CML
4.5b 23/03/2018 CML
10.7 06/02/2018 CML
1.11a 06/02/2018 CML
6.7.1 27/05/2016 CML
6.7.4 05/11/2015 CML
14.2.2 10/08/2015 CML
6.14.1b 01/12/2014 CML
3.1.3 01/12/2014 CML

Last update 03/11/2018

TSB Conveyancing Panel Sample Enquires to our Call Center from members of the public

On what basis could a firm of solicitors be excluded from the TSB approved conveyancing panel?
A survey recently commissioned by the Solicitors Regulatory Authority found that three quarters of solicitor practices had been excluded from a lender panel. The top reasons in order are :
  1. lack of transactions
  2. the lawyer is a sole practitioner
  3. as part of the HSBC panel reduction
  4. regulatory contact by SRA
  5. accidental removal. We are not aware of the specific or common criteria for removal by TSB
I am due to move into my new home next Thursday. I have now been asked to send a copy of my building insurance schedule by my solicitor as as he informs me that he is duty bound to validate that it is in order for TSB. What risks do TSB expect the insurance to cover?
Any lawyer on the TSB conveyancing panel would need to check that the following risks are covered fire; lightning; aircraft; explosion; earthquake; storm; flood; escape of water or oil; riot; malicious damage; theft or attempted theft; falling trees and branches and aerials; subsidence; heave;landslip;collision;accidental damage to underground services;professional fees, demolition and site clearance costs; and public liability to anyone else. There are some other issues such as the level of excess that are set out in TSB’s Part 2 requirements of the CML Handbook (last updated on TSB). Being on the TSB conveyancing panel your lawyer is expect to follow these instructions.
Do all the firms listed on your search have online case tracking as I was under the impression that this was a precondition of being on the TSB solicitor panel?
The Council of Mortgage Lenders or BSA do not require online case tracking. Some law firms operate such technology and some don't.
My lawyers in Liverpool have advised me that no longer have my conveyancing file. To assist with my purchase I took out a mortgage with TSB. Is it case that being on the TSB conveyancing panel they need to have retained the file for a prescribed period?
It very much depends from lender to lender but many of the Terms and Conditions of Conveyancing Panel Appointment require the file to be held for a period of 6 years. That being said we have not seen a copy of the TSB Conveyancing Panel Terms. It might be worth you contacting TSB directly.
Can I be sure that the solicitor on the TSB panel is any good?
seeking recommendations is a good start. Before you go ahead check if they offer a no sale no fee offer. Also you often get what you pay for - a firm which quotes more will often provide a better service than one which is cheap as chips. We would always advocate that you speak with the solicitor handling your conveyancing
I have a mortgage with TSB. Conveyancing has been completed 12 months ago. If I am intending to rent out my property and do not currently have a buy-to-let mortgage do I need to remortgage to a buy-to-let mortgage or inform TSB?
TSB must be informed of your intention before letting out your property as this is likely to be a breach of TSB’s mortgage conditions. It may be that TSB will permit you to let out your former home without needing to switch to a buy-to-let mortgage but some lenders will add a surcharge to your mortgage rate to reflect the higher risk. You should contact TSB directly. You need not do this via a TSB conveyancing panel solicitor.
My ex -wife’s name is on the TSB mortgage of my property but not on the land registry. The apartment was transferred to me on our divorce many years ago by way of a sealed court order. Does my ex still have a say on the sale even though the land registry showing the property in my name alone? Will I be required to take her name of the TSB mortgage in order to sell?
As regards the TSB mortgage, it is unusual that your ex-wife’s name remains on the mortgage but not on the title. It is conceivable that this is an oversight on the part of your conveyancers to ensure that her name was removed or even an administrative error on the part of TSB in failing to update their data. In any event, it should cause difficulty providing her name no longer appears on the Land Registry title and you have a court order ordering that the property is transferred to you.